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Spatter Contamination in Dental Practices

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Infectious diseases endanger all dental personnel during treatment, especially when spatter and aerosols are produced. Therefore, there is a strong need for better infection control principles during all treatments.”

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Aerosols and splatter in dentistry. Part 7: ADA, CDC, OSHA, & Legal Considerations

AeroShield Aerosol Extractor reduces bioaerosols released into the operatory during dental procedures. Learn more at www.AeroShieldHealth.com

The aerosols and splatter generated during dental procedures have the potential to spread infection to dental personnel and other people in the dental office.”

“ The ADA and CDC have recommended that all blood-contaminated aerosols and splatter should be minimized. Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations state that “all procedures involving blood or other potentially infectious materials shall be performed in such a manner as to minimize splashing, spraying, spattering, and generation of droplets of the these substances.”

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Aerosols and splatter in dentistry. Part 6: Methods of reducing airborne contamination in the dental office

AeroShield Aerosol Extractor reduces bioaerosols released into the operatory during dental procedures. Learn more at www.AeroShieldHealth.com

“During routine dental treatment, there is a strong likelihood that aerosolized material will include viruses, blood, and supra- and subgingival plaque organisms.“

” A true aerosol or droplet nuclei may be present in the air of the operatory for up to 30 minutes after a procedure. This means that after a dental procedure, if the operator removes a protective barrier such as a face mask to talk to a patient when a procedure is completed, the potential for contact with airborne contaminated material remains.”

” This is of particular concern owing to the fact that periodontal procedures always are performed in the presence of blood and instruments such as the ultrasonic scaler, which has been shown to create the greatest amount of aerosol contamination, are used.”

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Aerosols and splatter in dentistry. Part 5: Composition of Dental Aerosols

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“components of saliva, nasopharyngeal secretions, plaque, blood, tooth components and any material used in the dental procedure, such as abrasives for air polishing and air abrasion, all are present in dental aerosols”

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Aerosols and splatter in dentistry. Part 4: Sources of Airborne Contamination during Dental Treatment

AeroShield Aerosol Eliminator reduces bioaerosols released into the operatory during dental procedures. Learn more at www.AeroShieldHealth.com

“the mouth harbors bacteria and viruses from the nose, throat and respiratory tract. These may included various pathogenic viruses and bacteria that are present in the saliva and oral fluids. Any dental procedure that has the potential to aerosolize saliva will cause airborne contamination with organisms from some or all of these sources“

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Aerosols and splatter in dentistry. Part 3: Dental Aerosol and Splatter

AeroShield Aerosol Extractor reduces bioaerosols released into the operatory during dental procedures. Learn more at www.AeroShieldHealth.com

“The smaller particles of an aerosol (0.5 to 10 μm in diameter) have the potential to penetrate and lodge in the smaller passages of the lungs and are thought to carry the greatest potential for transmitting infections.“
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Aerosols and splatter in dentistry. Part 2: Disease Transmission Through an Airborne Route

AeroShield Aerosol Extractor reduces bioaerosols released into the operatory during dental procedures. Learn more at www.AeroShieldHealth.com

”The potential routes for the spread of infection in a dental office are ... contact with infectious particles from the patient that have become airborne. There is a long history of infections that have been transmitted by an airborne route.”

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